The Negative Impact of Boko Haram Insurgency on Women and Children in Northern Nigeria: An Assessment

  • Mustapha Alhaji Ali Department of Political Science and Administration. Yobe State University, Damaturu, Nigeria
  • Ummu Atiyah Ahmad Zakuan Ghazali Shafie Graduate School of Government College of Law, Government and International Studies School of International Studies (SOIS), University of Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
  • Mohammad Zaki bin Ahmad Ghazali Shafie Graduate School of Government College of Law, Government and International Studies School of International Studies (SOIS), University of Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Keywords: Boko Haram, Children, Insurgency, Negative Impacts, Northern Nigeria, Women.

Abstract

This paper studies the negative impacts of Boko Haram insurgency on women and children in northern Nigeria. Indeed, Boko Haram has affected the lives of the general populace in northern Nigeria, precisely women and children, by turning the women to widows and children to orphans, the negative events of the sect groups have continually coursing a serious damage to the lives and properties of the peoples in the northern region. The researcher used the Secondary source in acquiring the appropriate data. The study found that this set of individuals and their negative activities have affected the lives and properties of women and children. It is noted that many women have turned to widows and children to orphans. In view of this, the paper recommends that the government should intervein to provide the affected women and children with some empowerment programmes. It should also provide a good shelter to those that lost their husbands and residents, the government, traditional rulers, and religious leaders should help in assisting the children by enrolling them to schools like their fellow counterparts. There is a need for special rehabilitation and trauma centers in the affected states, especially for women and children who have had terrible knowledge during the insurgency period.

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Published
2018-09-24
How to Cite
Alhaji Ali, M., Zakuan, U. A. A., & Ahmad, M. Z. bin. (2018). The Negative Impact of Boko Haram Insurgency on Women and Children in Northern Nigeria: An Assessment. American International Journal of Social Science Research, 3(1), 27-33. Retrieved from http://www.cribfb.com/journal/index.php/aijssr/article/view/141
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Articles